Research and development

I have been given list of elemis to consider with regards to creative narrative within my environment design. Below is research that I have done based on this information.

Joseph Campbell links:

Joseph Campbell Foundation: https://www.jcf.org/

Creative Mythology: https://www.jcf.org/works/creative-mythology-9/

-This volume explores the whole inner story of modern culture, spanning our entire        philosophical, spiritual, and artistic history since the Dark Ages, and treating our unique position as the creators of our own mythology. The Masks of God is a four-volume study of world religion and myth that stands as one of Joseph Campbell’s masterworks. On completing it (in this volume in 1968), he wrote:-

The Hero with a Thousand Faces (first published in 1949) is a work of comparative mythology by American mythologist Joseph Campbell. In this book, Campbell discusses his theory of the journey of the archetypal hero found in world mythologies.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hero_with_a_Thousand_Faces)

monomyth. Noun. (plural monomyths) (mythology) a cyclical journey or quest undertaken by a mythical hero.

cyclical – cycle

Campbell describes a number of stages or steps along this journey. The hero starts in the ordinary world, and receives a call to enter an unusual world of strange powers and events (a call to adventure)

Very few myths contain all of these stages—some myths contain many of the stages, while others contain only a few; some myths may have as a focus only one of the stages, while other myths may deal with the stages in a somewhat different order. These stages may be organized in a number of ways, including division into three sections: Departure (sometimes called Separation), Initiation and Return. “Departure” deals with the hero venturing forth on the quest, “Initiation” deals with the hero’s various adventures along the way, and “Return” deals with the hero’s return home with knowledge and powers acquired on the journey

The classic examples of the monomyth relied upon by Campbell and other scholars include the stories of Osiris, Prometheus, the Buddha, Moses, Mohammed, and Jesus, although Campbell cites many other classic myths from many cultures which rely upon this basic structure. The alleged similarities between these shared hero legends is one of the basic arguments of the Christ myth theory.

While Campbell offers a discussion of the hero’s journey by using the Freudian concepts popular in the 1940s and 1950s, the monomythic structure is not tied to these concepts. Similarly, Campbell uses a mixture of Jungian archetypes, unconscious forces, and Arnold van Gennep‘s structuring of rites of passage rituals to provide some illumination.[4] However, this pattern of the hero’s journey influences artists and intellectuals worldwide, suggesting a basic usefulness for Campbell’s insights not tied to academic categories and mid-20th century forms of analysis.

Structuralism – (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structuralism)

In sociology, anthropology and linguistics, structuralism is the methodology that elements of human culture must be understood in terms of their relationship to a larger, overarching system or structure. It works to uncover the structures that underlie all the things that humans do, think, perceive, and feel. Alternatively, as summarized by philosopher Simon Blackburn, structuralism is “the belief that phenomena of human life are not intelligible except through their interrelations. These relations constitute a structure, and behind local variations in the surface phenomena there are constant laws of abstract culture”.[

Campbell borrowed the term monomyth from Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. In addition, Joyce’s Ulysses was also highly influential in the structuring of The Hero with a Thousand Faces.

Influences on artists

In games[edit]

Jenova Chen, lead designer at thatgamecompany, also cites “The Hero’s Journey” as the primary inspiration for the PlayStation 3 game Journey (2012).[13]

Mark Rosewater, head designer of the Magic: The Gathering trading card game, cites “The Hero’s Journey” as a major inspiration for “The Weatherlight Saga”, an epic storyarc that went from 1997 to 2001, and spanned multiple cardsets, comic books, and novels.[

“The Belly of the Whale” — Joseph Campbell      (https://biblioklept.org/2012/07/08/the-belly-of-the-whale-joseph-campbell/)

 

 

Dan P. McAdams

 

 

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